thinking out loud and saying nothing

Looking out of indifference

Looking out of indifference

Along Iceland’s eastern coast.
This photo received an honorable mention in National Geographic photo competition.

Along Iceland’s eastern coast.

This photo received an honorable mention in National Geographic photo competition.

Imagination Cultivation by Nanami Cowdroy

Imagination Cultivation by Nanami Cowdroy

Chained by guilt: noellosvald

Chained by guilt: noellosvald

Senyor Malaussene: Maria Corte

Senyor Malaussene: Maria Corte

The Beautiful Earth - Saeed Al Amri

The Beautiful Earth - Saeed Al Amri

seoirseosial
Self-Portrait 2007: American painter Chuck Close reinvented portraiture in the late 1960s with his series of monumental paintings of himself and fellow artists.

Self-Portrait 2007: American painter Chuck Close reinvented portraiture in the late 1960s with his series of monumental paintings of himself and fellow artists.

Threesome: by tony boyce

Threesome: by tony boyce

Passing a tree: Peter Polter

Passing a tree: Peter Polter

Baptism Traveler: Jennifer Hudson

Baptism Traveler: Jennifer Hudson

[hyphen] Americans

They loom out of the darkness, as if hovering uncertainly between past and present, offering themselves for our scrutiny with an intensity that borders on the confrontational. Part of it is the look these people give us, staring at the camera for as long as sixty seconds and more, resulting in a kind of clenching of the eyes (as a sitter, you become aware of the sheer physicality of looking under these conditions, of the need to fight your eyes’ desire to wander). Part of it is the texture of their skin, turned into rugged planetary surfaces by the tintype’s peculiar response to color and high resolution of detail. And part of it is the differential focus with which the subjects are depicted—sharp in some places and strangely liquid in others—as if their bodies are floating in a primordial wet world with just the faces breaking the surface. For all these reasons, Keliy Anderson-Staley’s tintype portraits are best described as other worldly, rather than antiquarian.

[hyphen] Americans

They loom out of the darkness, as if hovering uncertainly between past and present, offering themselves for our scrutiny with an intensity that borders on the confrontational. Part of it is the look these people give us, staring at the camera for as long as sixty seconds and more, resulting in a kind of clenching of the eyes (as a sitter, you become aware of the sheer physicality of looking under these conditions, of the need to fight your eyes’ desire to wander). Part of it is the texture of their skin, turned into rugged planetary surfaces by the tintype’s peculiar response to color and high resolution of detail. And part of it is the differential focus with which the subjects are depicted—sharp in some places and strangely liquid in others—as if their bodies are floating in a primordial wet world with just the faces breaking the surface. For all these reasons, Keliy Anderson-Staley’s tintype portraits are best described as other worldly, rather than antiquarian.